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Welcome to the New Lantern blog. Our goal is to shine light on leading innovators and creative artists, and how your business can learn and profit from them. Companies large, medium, and small can benefit from employees who think more creatively. New Lantern may be just the source of inspiration your company needs to spark more innovative products, services, and processes.


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Archive for Tag 'leadership'

Rembrandt’s Favorite Subject: Rembrandt

Posted by on July 15, 2017 at 3:30 pm

On this day in 1606, renowned artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn was born in the town of Leiden in the Dutch Republic, now known as the Netherlands.

Few artists have been more celebrated and revered. Whereas many of his notable works remain in Amsterdam at the Rijksmuseum, selected works hang in the most respected museums and galleries on the planet, including the Louvre in Paris, the National Gallery of London, the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, and the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York.

His artistry spanned the three fields of painting, drawing, and printmaking during the Dutch Golden Age. His genre and themes included portraits, landscapes, Biblical, historical and mythological scenes. His favorite subject – himself. Throughout his career, Rembrandt painted numerous self-portraits which serve as a unique historical record of the artist. He was, in short, the original selfie artist.

Introspection and self-awareness can be a valuable tool. A strong leader knows his or her own strengths, and seeks to hone and leverage them. Likewise, one should seek to improve upon known weaknesses, while surrounding yourself with others who possess strengths that can supplement areas where you might fall short. Such an approach can lead to great results for your business or organization.

So the next time someone says to you, “You’re no Rembrandt,” you might consider replying “no, but I’m trying to learn from him – and myself.”

A Cut Above

Posted by on October 2, 2015 at 6:51 pm

Fiskars PowerGear2 Pruner
Among the 35 finalists in this year’s Fast Company’s annual Innovation By Design Awards was the PowerGear2 Pruning Tools from Fiskars. The award winners were announced last month and are featured in this month’s magazine now on newsstands.

In Fast Company’s own words: “The pruning tools are ingeniously designed with a rotating gear that provides a boost of power in the middle of the cut, where branches are thickest. Additionally, the latest models are easier on the hands, as their handles have been modified with a more oval shape and a gel skin that prevents blisters.”

Now I realize that pruning products may not get all hearts to racing, but as an avid gardener, I couldn’t be more pleased with Fast Company’s selection. I’ve used Fiskars pruning tools for years, and look forward to purchasing its PowerGear2 pruner.

Fiskars trip to the innovation awards stand this year was no cake walk. It faced some serious competition from 1,500 submissions across 14 categories. Other finalists included Adobe’s Ink and Slide, Google’s Cardboard VR, Janinge’s multi-purpose stackable chairs, Procter & Gamble and Whirlpool’s Swash System, and Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3.

For those of you who think innovation only comes from Silicon Valley startups or leading technology companies, think again. Fiskars was established as an ironworks company in Finland in 1649. This is not a typo. For nearly 366 years Fiskars has been churning out some of the finest cutting, shearing, and pruning products on the planet. And, as indicative of its 2015 Fast Company award, Fiskars has proved that it still knows a thing or two about good design and innovation.

Today, Fiskars has 8,600 employees in 30 countries and sells its products in over 100 countries. So celebrate good design and longevity today by purchasing one of Fiskars’ products. It just might help you stay a cut above the competition.

A Labor of Love

Posted by on September 1, 2014 at 11:58 pm

Labor Day was first celebrated in 1882 as a day set aside to commemorate the “social and economic achievement of the American worker,” according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Labor Day has since come to represent the end of summer, the beginning of football season, and one of the last opportunities to get in those picnics, barbecues, and backyard family gatherings before the chill of autumn sets in across many parts of the country.

This year, Labor Day for your company should serve as a reminder to re-invest in your employees. Your employees are your company’s single most valuable asset. You already invest heavily in your employees through wages and benefits, but are you truly getting a solid return on that investment? Most likely you are not, and you have no one to blame but yourself.

Treat your employees like a valuable resource, and you will in turn reap the benefits. Nurture their talents, encourage risk-taking, and incent creativity and innovation.

Developing talent within your organization does not happen overnight. It takes persistence, a sustained dose of right-brain stimulus, and a senior management team who is willing to provide a culture where talent and creativity can take root and thrive.

Let New Lantern help your company mine and grow the talents of your employees through creative leadership training, performance-based compensation and incentive programs, and other inventive business innovation methods.

The pay-off for your company could be the next hot product or service offering, which is all the more reason to love your employees.

How the Vietnam War Saved My Life

Posted by on April 14, 2014 at 7:12 pm

It was the summer of 1983, and the Police, Men at Work, and Duran Duran were playing on the radio. I was 12-years old and about to start the seventh grade. I had made the decision not to return to my dad’s home in South Dakota, but instead live with my mom in Maryland and go to a new school. A few days before school started my mom took my brother and me to the mall for new clothes.

About a mile from the mall is where my life changed forever.

Our car was violently struck by an 18-wheeler. The mammoth truck had run a red light, crashing broadside into our car. It crushed and flipped our vehicle like a toy, critically injuring myself and my older brother. My mom was not as lucky; she didn’t survive the initial impact.

I woke sometime later in the Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland hospital in Baltimore. My brother and I had been “medevaced” by helicopter directly to this world-class trauma center. We were surrounded by doctors and nurses working on our wounds in a controlled chaos. They were all wearing their trademark pink scrubs, the uniform of these “special forces” of the medical world.

The predecessor of the University of Maryland’s trauma center opened in 1960s, and was the first of its kind. It was the brain child of R Adams Cowley, MD, who is known as the “father of trauma medicine.”

After treating the wounded in World War II and working for years studying traumatic injury, Dr. Cowley came to the conclusion that treating critically injured patients during that first hour was crucial to survival, referring to this time as the “Golden Hour.”  He determined this first hour was the difference between life and death.

But how does the Vietnam War play a role in my survival?

At the time that Dr. Cowley’s trauma center was becoming fully functional in Baltimore, the Vietnam War was coming to a close. And it was during the Vietnam War that the use of helicopters for medical evacuations was perfected. Dr. Cowley recognized the value of helicopters, and they quickly became an integral component of the new trauma unit. This innovation, combined with top notch teams of trauma doctors and nurses, soon made the center a huge success. And this success has carried on to this day as the center remains a world leader.

As for me, my severe injuries in 1983 kept me in the hospital for months, followed by even more time spent at home recovering. I ultimately did fully recover, and 30 years later, I am married and have three children of my own.

It’s thanks to Dr. Cowley’s innovation to the medical world that people like myself, who are able to make it through that critical “Golden Hour,” survive traumatic, life-threatening injuries.

Dr. Cowley passed away in 1991, but you can help him receive the recognition he deserves by honoring him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Click the link to sign a letter of support.

You Can Get There From Here

Posted by on January 12, 2014 at 9:03 pm

You Can Get There From Here photo

“You can’t get there from here.” Chances are you’ve heard this oft-repeated phrase all your life. Admittedly, I’ve used it myself on many of occasions. Yet, when I stop and really think about what I’m saying, or what someone may be saying to me with this phrase, I actually take issue with it.

From where I sit, I can get to anywhere. Whether it’s to an actual place or state of mind, I can get there. Just ask Google Maps, or Bing Maps, or MapQuest, or your shrink, or your partner or spiritual guru. They’ll all tell you the same thing. “Yes, you can.”

Now this is not to say that your desired destination may not be hard to get to. It very well may.  But that didn’t stop Rosa Parks from getting on that bus in Alabama in 1955. It didn’t stop Neil Armstrong from stepping out onto the moon’s surface in 1969. And it didn’t stop 64-year-old Diana Nyad from swimming from Cuba to Florida last year – after failing to do so in her four previous attempts.

Likewise, it shouldn’t stop you, your company, or your organization from going to wherever you need or want to go.

So the next time someone cavalierly tells you that you can’t get there from here, set them straight. Tell them they’re wrong. Hell, take them with you. They may learn something on the way.

Fear No More

Posted by on December 7, 2013 at 8:06 pm

Have you ever had a good idea for your company, but felt if you raised it to your management, they might scoff at the idea – or worse, tell you to mind your own business? Fear is one of the biggest obstacles to innovation in any company. Fear of ridicule. Fear of embarrassment. Fear of being told that your idea is stupid.

Too many companies unfortunately promote an environment that embraces this fear. It starts with managers who fear that their direct reports might actually outshine them with a creative or ingenious idea. These fearful managers exist at the lowest levels of the company, at the highest levels of the company, and every level in between.

There are also structural factors that promote innovation-killing fear in a company. “We’re the Office of Corporate Strategy.” “We’re the Office of Innovation.” “We’re the Office of the CEO.” Or, “We’re the number one product group for the company.” “You stick to your day job, and let us worry about the company’s new ideas or innovation strategy.” Sound familiar?

These are also the same companies which many times find themselves slipping from first, to second, to way back in the pack, while younger, hungrier, and more fearless companies eat their lunch.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Start by leveraging the laws of statistics. Challenge every single person in your organization to stretch his or her thinking. Promote a culture that holds to this axiom: no idea is a bad idea. Of course, you’ll need to point out that only a few ideas will be worthy of pursuing. Yet, your odds of finding a pearl are increased as you open up a larger number of oyster shells.

Try it. You have nothing to fear, but fear itself.